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Post-It: enable mobile hotspot on Mobile Vikings (BE) 2017-07-25

Posted by claudio in Uncategorized.
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Yesterday, it was the second time I wondered why the hotspot of my MotoG5 phone wasn’t working with my tablet (after an OS update on the phone and the tablet).

The tablet connected fine to the phone hotspot through wifi, but the traffic was not routed to the Internet. I forgot about the first time I debugged the problem, so a little post-it not to forget it again. The secret is to change the APN type to:

APN type: supl,default

As reference, the other settings for Mobile Vikings:

APN: web.be
Username: web
Password: web
MCC: 206
MNC: 20
Authentication Type: PAP

So, what about (Perl 6) dependencies? 2017-05-28

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DependenciesWhen I need to program something, most of the time I use Perl 5, Go or Perl 6. Which one depends on the existence and maturity of libraries and the deployment strategy (and I must admit, probably my mood). Most applications I write at work are not that big, but they need to be stable and secure. Some end up in production as an extension or addition to the software that is the core of our authentication and authorisation infrastructure. Some programs are managed by other teams, e.g. of sysadmin-type applications like the monitoring of a complex chain of microservices. Finally, proof of concept code is often needed when designing a new architecture. I believe that If your software is cumbersome/fragile to install and maintain, people won’t use it. Or worse, stick with an old version.

Hence, I like CPAN. A lot. I love how easy it is to download, build, test and install Perl 5 libraries. cpanminus made the process even more zero-conf. When not using Docker, tools like App::Fatpacker and Carton can bundle libraries and you end with a mostly self-contained application (thx mst and miyagawa).

Go, a compiled language, took a different path and opted for static binaries. The included (Go) libraries are not downloaded and built when you’re deploying, but when you’re developing. Although this is a huge advantage, I am not too fond of the dependency system: you mostly end up downloading random versions from the master branch of random Github repos (the workaround is using external webservices like gopkg.in, not ideal). The only sane way is to “vendor in” (also with a tool) your dependencies pretty much the same way Carton does: you copy the libs in your repository (but still without versioning). I hear the Go community is working at this, but so far there are only workarounds.

In the Perl 6 world, the zef module manager does provide a kind of cpanminus-like experience. However, in contrast with cpanminus it does this by downloading code from a zillion Github repo’s where the versioning is questionable. The is no clear link between the version fixed in the metadata (META6.json) and branches/tags on the repo. Like mentioned above, Go gets away with this due to static compiling, although the price is high: your projects will have dozens of versions of the same lib, probably even with a different API… and no way to declare the version in the code.

The centralised Perl 5 approach approach is fairly complex. It works because of the maturity of the ecosystem (the “big” modules are pretty stable) and the taken-for-granted testing culture (thank you toolchain and testing people!). Actually, in my opinion, the only projects that really solved the dependency management problem are the Linux & BSD distributions by boxing progress in long release cycles. Developers want the last shiny lib, so that won’t work.

The Perl 6 devs have no static compiling on the agenda, so it’s clear that the random Github repo situation is far from ideal. That’s why I was pretty excited to read on #perl6 that Perl 6 code can now be uploaded to CPAN (with Shoichi Kaji’s mi6) and installed (with Nick Logan’s zef). Today, the Perl 6 ecosystem has neither the maturity of the one of Perl 5 nor its testing culture. The dependency chain can be pretty fragile at times. Working within a central repository with an extensive and mature testing infrastructure will certainly help over time. One place to look for libraries, rate them, find the documentation, and so on. Look at their state and the state of its dependencies. This is huge. But I don’t think that CPAN will fix the problems of a young ecosystem right away. I think there is an opportunity here to build on the shoulders on CPAN, while keeping the advantages of a new language: find out what works.

Personally, I would love to have a built-in packaging solution like Carton –or even App::Fatpacker– out of the box. I think there is something to be said for the “vendoring-in” of the dependencies in the application repo (putting all the dependencies in a directory in the repo). The Perl 6 language/compiler has advantages over Perl 5. You can specify the compiler you target so your code doesn’t break when your compiler (also) targets a more recent milestone (allowing the core devs to advance by breaking stuff). Soon, you’ll be able to You can even load different versions of the same library in the same program (thx for the correction, nine).

The same tool could even vendor (and update) different version of the same library. At “package time” this tool would look at your sources and include only the versions of the libraries that are referenced. The result could be a tar or a directory with everything needed to run your application. As a bonus point, it would be nice to still support random repos for libraries-in-progress or for authors that opted not to use CPAN.

My use case is not everyone’s, so I wonder what people would like to see based on their experience or expectations. I think that now, with the possibility of a CPAN migration, it a good time to think about this. Let’s gather ideas. The implementation is for later :).

Post-it: how to revive X on Ubuntu after nvidia kills it 2017-04-12

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I am not a hug fan of the Linux Nvidia drivers*, but once in a while I try them to check the performance of the machine. More often than not, I end up in a console and no X/Wayland.

I have seen some Ubuntu users reinstalling their machine after this f* up, so here my notes to fix it (I always forget the initramfs step and end up wasting a lot of time):

$ sudo apt-get remove --purge nvidia-*
$ sudo mv /etc/X11/xorg.conf /etc/X11/xorg.conf_pre-nvidia
$ sudo update-initramfs -u
$ reboot

*: I am not a fan of the Windows drivers either now that Nvidia decided to harvest emails and track you if you want updates.

Notes from my Unity -> Gnome3 migration 2017-04-07

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Updated: 20170419: gnome-shell extension browser integration.
Updated: 20170420: natural scrolling on X instead of Wayland.
Updated: 20170512: better support for multi monitor setups.
Updated: 20170525: add “No TopLeft Hot Corner”, use upstream “Top Icons Plus” instead of the one in the repos.

Introduction

Mark Shuttleworth, founder of Ubuntu and Canonical, dropped a bombshell: Ubuntu drops Unity 8 and –by extension– also the Mir graphical server on the desktop. Starting from the 18.04 release, Ubuntu will use Gnome 3 as the default Desktop environment.

Sadly, the desktop environment used by millions of Ubuntu users –Unity 7– has no path forward now. Unity 7 runs on the X.org graphical stack, while the Linux world –including Ubuntu now– is slowly but surely moving to Wayland (it will be the default on Ubuntu 18.04 LTS). It’s clear that Unity has its detractors, and it’s true that the first releases (6 years ago!) were limited and buggy. However, today, Unity 7 is a beautiful and functional desktop environment. I happily use it at home and at work.

Soon-to-be-dead code is dead code, so even as a happy user I don’t see the interest in staying with Unity. I prefer to make the jump now instead of sticking a year with a desktop on life support. Among other environments, I have been a full time user of CDE, Window Maker, Gnome 1.*, KDE 2.*, Java Desktop System, OpenSolaris Desktop, LXDE and XFCE. I’ll survive :).

The idea of these lines is to collect changes I felt I needed to make to a vanilla Ubuntu Gnome 3 setup to make it work for me. I made the jump 1 week before the release of 17.04, so I’ll stick with 17.04 and skip the 16.10 instructions (in short: you’ll need to install gnome-shell-extension-dashtodock from an external source instead of the Ubuntu repos).

The easiest way to make the use Gnome on Ubuntu is, of course, installing the Ubuntu Gnome distribution. If you’re upgrading, you can do it manually. In case you want to remove Unity and install Gnome at the same time:
$ sudo apt-get remove --purge ubuntu-desktop lightdm && sudo apt-get install ubuntu-gnome-desktop && apt-get remove --purge $(dpkg -l |grep -i unity |awk '{print $2}') && sudo apt-get autoremove -y

Changes

Add Extensions:

  1. Install Gnome 3 extensions to customize the desktop experience:
    $ sudo apt-get install -y gnome-tweak-tool gnome-shell-extension-dashtodock gnome-shell-extension-better-volume gnome-shell-extension-refreshwifi gnome-shell-extension-disconnect-wifi
  2. Install the gnome-shell integration (the one on the main Ubuntu repos does not work):
    $ sudo add-apt-repository ppa:ne0sight/chrome-gnome-shell && sudo apt-get update && sudo apt-get install chrome-gnome-shell
  3. Install the “Multi-monitor add-on“, the “Top Icon Plus” (we use an upstream version op the previous two extensension because the ones on the Ubuntu repos are buggy), the “Not Topleft Hot Corner” (a must in a multi-monitor setup) and the “Refresh wifi” extensions. You’ll need to install a browser plugin. Refresh the page after installing the plugin.
  4. Log off in order to activate the extensions.
  5. Start gnome-tweak-tool and enable “Better volume indicator” (scroll wheel to change volume), “Dash to dock” (a more Unity-like Dock, configurable. I set the “Icon size limit” to 24 and “Behavior-Click Action” to “minimize”), “Disconnect wifi” (allow disconnection of network without setting Wifi to off), “Refresh Wifi connections” (auto refresh wifi list), “Multi monitors add-on” (add a top bar to other monitors) and “Topicons plus” (put non-Gnome icons like Dropbox and pidgin on the top menu).

Change window size and buttons:

  1. On the Windows tab, I enabled the Maximise and Minise Titlebar Buttons.
  2. Make the window top bars smaller if you wish. Just create ~/.config/gtk-3.0/gtk.css with these lines:
    /* From: http://blog.samalik.com/make-your-gnome-title-bar-smaller-fedora-24-update/ */
    window.ssd headerbar.titlebar {
    padding-top: 4px;
    padding-bottom: 4px;
    min-height: 0;
    }
    window.ssd headerbar.titlebar button.titlebutton {
    padding: 0px;
    min-height: 0;
    min-width: 0;
    }

Disable “natural scrolling” for mouse wheel:

While I like “natural scrolling” with the touchpad (enable it in the mouse preferences), I don’t like it on the mouse wheel. To disable it only on the mouse:
$ gsettings set org.gnome.desktop.peripherals.mouse natural-scroll false

If you run Gnome on good old X instead of Wayland (e.g. for driver support of more stability while Wayland matures), you need to use libinput instead of the synaptic driver to make “natural scrolling” possible:

$ sudo mkdir -p /etc/X11/xorg.conf.d && sudo cp -rp /usr/share/X11/xorg.conf.d/40-libinput.conf /etc/X11/xorg.conf.d/

Log out.

Enable Thunderbird notifications:

For Thunderbird new mail notification I installed the gnotifier Thunderbird add-on: https://addons.mozilla.org/en-us/thunderbird/addon/gnotifier/

Extensions that I tried, liked but ended not using:

  • gnome-shell-extension-pixelsaver: it feels unnatural on a 3 screen setup like I use at work, e.g. min-max-close windows buttons on the main screen for windows on other screens..
  • gnome-shell-extension-hide-activities: the top menu is already mostly empty, so it’s not saving much.
  • gnome-shell-extension-move-clock: although I prefer the clock on the right, the default middle position makes sense as it integrates with notifications.

That’s it (so far 🙂 ).

Thx to @sil, @adsamalik and Jonathan Carter.

Intel NUC 5CPYH and Ubuntu 16.04 2016-09-22

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Intel NUCI decided to move my home backup drives to ZFS because I wanted built-in file checksumming as a prevention against silent data corruption. I chose ZFS over BrtFS because I have considerable experience with ZFS on Solaris.

I knew that ZFS loves RAM, hence I upgraded my home “server” (NFS/Samba/Docker) from an old laptop with 2GB of RAM to the cheapest Intel NUC I could find with USB3, Gigabit ethernet and 8GB of RAM. The C5CPYH model fitted the bill.

Two remarks for those that want to install Linux on this barebones mini-pc:

  • Update the BIOS first, otherwise the Ubuntu 16.04 server USB installer won’t start. My model had a very recent BIOS version, but still I needed the latest. BIOS updates can be found here. (There is also an option to select Linux as the OS in the BIOS.)
  • Ubuntu 16.04 server did not find the network card at install time (missing Realtek drivers). Just finish the installation. Once rebooted, the correct driver for the network card will be already loaded. Just finish the IP configuration in /etc/network/interfaces.

rakudo-pkg: Create OS packages for Rakudo Perl 6 using Docker 2016-09-05

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camelia-logo

There was an interesting discussion on #perl6 (irc.freenode.net) about the use of rakudobrew as a way for end-users to install Rakudo Perl 6 (see how-to-get-rakudo).

rakudobrew, inspired by perlbrew, is a way to manage (and compile) different versions of rakudo. nine argued that it’s primarily meant as a tool for rakudo developers. Because of the increased complexity (e.g. when dealing with modules) it’s not targeted at end-users. While being a big fan of rakudobrew, I agree with nine.

The problem is that there are no Linux binaries on the download page (there are for MacOS and Windows), so users are stuck with building from source (it can be fun, but after a while it isn’t).

rakudo-pkg is a github project to help system administrators (and hopefully Rakudo release managers) to easily provide native Linux packages for end users. So far, I added support for creating Ubuntu 16.04 LTS amd64 and i386 packages and Centos 7 amd64. These are the systems I use the most. Feel free to add support for more distributions.

rakudo-pkg uses Docker. The use of containers means that there is no longer need for chasing dependencies and no risks of installing files all over your system. It also means that as long the building machine is a Linux 64-bit OS, you can build packages for *all* supported distributions.

Within the containers, rakudo-pkg uses fpm. The created packages are minimalistic by design: they don’t run any pre/post scripts and all the files are installed in /opt/rakudo. You’ll have to add /opt/rakudo/bin to your PATH. I also added two additional scripts to install Perl 6 module managers (both have similar functionalities):

install_panda_as_user.sh
install_zef_as_user.sh

If you just want to create native packages, just go to the bin directory and execute the run_pkgrakudo.pl command. In this case there is no need to locally build the Docker images: you’ll automatically retrieve the image from the rakudo namespace on Docker Hub. Of course, if you want to create the container images locally, you can use the supplied dockerfiles in the docker directory. Have a look at the README.md for more information.

You can find examples of packages created with rakudo-pkg here (they need to be moved to a more definitive URL).

Have fun.

https://github.com/nxadm/rakudo-pkg

Vim as a Perl 6 editor 2016-08-21

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EDITED on 20170211: syntastic-perl6 configuration changes

If you’re a Vim user you probably use it for almost everything. Out of the box, Perl 6 support is rather limited. That’s why many people use editors like Atom for Perl 6 code.

What if with a few plugins you could configure vim to be a great Perl 6 editor? I made the following notes while configuring Vim on my main machine running Ubuntu 16.04. The instructions should be trivially easy to port to other distributions or Operating Systems. Skip the applicable steps if you already have a working vim setup (i.e. do not overwrite you .vimrc file).

I maintain my Vim plugins using pathogen, as it allows me to directly use git clones from github. This is specially important for plugins in rapid development.
(If your .vim directory is a git repository, replace ‘git clone’ in the commands by ‘git submodule add’.)

Basic vim Setup

Install vim with scripting support and pathogen. Create the directory where the plugins will live:
$ sudo apt-get install vim-nox vim-pathogen && mkdir -p ~/.vim/bundle

$ vim-addons install pathogen

Create a minimal .vimrc in your $HOME, with at least this configuration (enabling pathogen). Lines commencing with ” are comments:

“Enable extra features (e.g. when run systemwide). Must be before pathogen
set nocompatible

“Enable pathogen
execute pathogen#infect()
“Enable syntax highlighting
syntax on
“Enable indenting
filetype plugin indent on

Additionally I use these settings (the complete .vimrc is linked atthe end):

“Set line wrapping
set wrap
set linebreak
set nolist
set formatoptions+=l

“Enable 256 colours
set t_Co=256

“Set auto indenting
set autoindent

“Smart tabbing
set expandtab
set smarttab
set sw=4 ” no of spaces for indenting
set ts=4 ” show \t as 2 spaces and treat 2 spaces as \t when deleting

“Set title of xterm
set title

” Highlight search terms
set hlsearch

“Strip trailing whitespace for certain type of files
autocmd BufWritePre *.{erb,md,pl,pl6,pm,pm6,pp,rb,t,xml,yaml,go} :%s/\s\+$//e

“Override tab espace for specific languages
autocmd Filetype ruby,puppet setlocal ts=2 sw=2

“Jump to the last position when reopening a file
au BufReadPost * if line(“‘\””) > 1 && line(“‘\””) <= line(“$”) |
\ exe “normal! g’\”” | endif

“Add a coloured right margin for recent vim releases
if v:version >= 703
set colorcolumn=80
endif

“Ubuntu suggestions
set showcmd    ” Show (partial) command in status line.
set showmatch  ” Show matching brackets.
set ignorecase ” Do case insensitive matching
set smartcase  ” Do smart case matching
set incsearch  ” Incremental search
set autowrite  ” Automatically save before commands like :next and :make
set hidden     ” Hide buffers when they are abandoned
set mouse=v    ” Enable mouse usage (all modes)

Install plugins

vim-perl for syntax highlighting:

$ git clone https://github.com/vim-perl/vim-perl.git ~ /.vim/bundle/vim-perl

vim-perl

vim-airline and themes for a status bar:
$ git clone https://github.com/vim-airline/vim-airline.git ~/.vim/bundle/vim-airline
$ git clone https://github.com/vim-airline/vim-airline-themes.git ~/.vim/bundle/vim-airline-themes
In vim type :Helptags

In  Ubuntu the ‘fonts-powerline’ package (sudo apt-get install fonts-powerline) installs fonts that enable nice glyphs in the statusbar (e.g. line effect instead of ‘>’, see the screenshot at https://github.com/vim-airline/vim-airline/wiki/Screenshots.

Add this to .vimrc for airline (the complete .vimrc is attached):
“airline statusbar
set laststatus=2
set ttimeoutlen=50
let g:airline#extensions#tabline#enabled = 1
let g:airline_theme=’luna’
“In order to see the powerline fonts, adapt the font of your terminal
“In Gnome Terminal: “use custom font” in the profile. I use Monospace regular.
let g:airline_powerline_fonts = 1

airline

Tabular for aligning text (e.g. blocks):
$ git clone https://github.com/godlygeek/tabular.git ~/.vim/bundle/tabular
In vim type :Helptags

vim-fugitive for Git integration:
$ git clone https://github.com/tpope/vim-fugitive.git ~/.vim/bundle/vim-fugitive
In vim type :Helptags

vim-markdown for markdown syntax support (e.g. the README.md of your module):
$ git clone https://github.com/plasticboy/vim-markdown.git ~/.vim/bundle/vim-markdown
In vim type :Helptags

Add this to .vimrc for markdown if you don’t want folding (the complete .vimrc is attached):
“markdown support
let g:vim_markdown_folding_disabled=1

synastic-perl6 for Perl 6 syntax checking support. I wrote this plugin to add Perl 6 syntax checking support to synastic, the leading vim syntax checking plugin. See the ‘Call for Testers/Announcement’ here. Instruction can be found in the repo, but I’ll paste it here for your convenience:

You need to install syntastic to use this plugin.
$ git clone https://github.com/scrooloose/syntastic.git ~/.vim/bundle/synastic
$ git clone https://github.com/nxadm/syntastic-perl6.git ~/.vim/bundle/synastic-perl6

Type “:Helptags” in Vim to generate Help Tags.

Syntastic and syntastic-perl6 vimrc configuration, (comments start with “):


"airline statusbar integration if installed. De-comment if installed
"set laststatus=2
"set ttimeoutlen=50
"let g:airline#extensions#tabline#enabled = 1
"let g:airline_theme='luna'
"In order to see the powerline fonts, adapt the font of your terminal
"In Gnome Terminal: "use custom font" in the profile. I use Monospace regular.
"let g:airline_powerline_fonts = 1

“syntastic syntax checking
let g:syntastic_always_populate_loc_list = 1
let g:syntastic_auto_loc_list = 1
let g:syntastic_check_on_open = 1
let g:syntastic_check_on_wq = 0
set statusline+=%#warningmsg#
set statusline+=%{SyntasticStatuslineFlag()}
set statusline+=%*

“Perl 6 support
“Optional comma separated list of quoted paths to be included to -I
“let g:syntastic_perl6lib = [ ‘/home/user/Code/some_project/lib’, ‘lib’ ]
“Optional perl6 binary (defaults to perl6 in your PATH)
“let g:syntastic_perl6_exec = ‘/opt/rakudo/bin/perl6’
“Register the checker provided by this plugin
let g:syntastic_perl6_checkers = [‘perl6’]
“Enable the perl6 checker (disabled out of the box because of security reasons:
“‘perl6 -c’ executes the BEGIN and CHECK block of code it parses. This should
“be fine for your own code. See: https://docs.perl6.org/programs/00-running
let g:syntastic_enable_perl6_checker = 1

Screenshot of syntastic-perl6

You complete me fuzzy search autocomplete:

$ git clone https://github.com/Valloric/YouCompleteMe.git ~/.vim/bundle/YouCompleteMe

Read the YouCompleteMe documentation for the dependencies for your OS and for the switches for additional non-fuzzy support for additional languages like C/C++, Go and so on. If you just want fuzzy complete support for Perl 6, the default is ok. If someone is looking for a nice project, a native Perl6 autocompleter for YouCompleteMe (instead of the fuzzy one) would be a great addition. You can install YouCompleteMe like this:
$ cd ~/.vim/bundle/YouCompleteMe && ./install.py

autocomplete

That’s it. I hope my notes are useful to someone. The complete .vimrc can be found here.

 

 

Please test: first release of syntastic-perl6, a vim syntax checker 2016-08-20

Posted by claudio in Uncategorized.
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Vimlogo.svgI think that Perl 6, as a fairly new language, needs good tooling not only to attract new programmers but also to make the job of Perl 6 programmers more enjoyable. If you’ve worked with an IDE before, you certainly agree that syntax checking is one of those things that we take for granted. Syntastic-perl6 is a plugin that adds Perl 6 syntax checking in Vim using Syntastic. Syntastic is the leading Vim plugin for syntax checking. It supports many programming languages.

If the plugin proves to be useful, I plan on a parallel track for Perl 6 support in Vim. On one hand, this plugin will track the latest Perl 6 Rakudo releases (while staying as backwards compatible as possible) and be the first to receive new functionality. On the other hand, once this plugin is well-tested and feature complete, it will hopefully be added to the main syntastic repo (it has it’s own branch upstream already) in order to provide out-of-the-box support for Perl 6.

So, what do we need to get there? We need testers and users, so they can make this plugin better by:

  • sending Pull Requests to make the code (vimscript) better where needed.
  • sending Pull Requests to add tests for error cases not yet tested (see the t directory) or -more importantely- caught.
  • posting issues for bugs or errors not-yet-caught. In that case copy-paste the error (e.g. within vim: :!perl6 -c %) and post a sample of the erroneous Perl 6 code in question.

The plugin, with installation instructions, is on its github repo at syntastic-perl6. With a vim module manage like pathogen you can directly use a clone of the repo.

Keep me posted!

 

MS Office 365 (Click-to-Run): Remove unused applications 2015-08-16

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Too many MS Office 365 appsUpdate 20160421:
– update for MS Office 2016.
– fix configuration.xml view on WordPress.

If you install Microsoft Office trough click-to-run you’ll end with the full suite installed. You can no longer select what application you want to install. That’s kind of OK because you pay for the complete suit. Or at least the organisation (school, work, etc.) offering the subscription does. But maybe you are like me and you dislike installing applications you don’t use. Or even more like me: you’re a Linux user with a Windows VM you boot once in a while out of necessity. And unused applications in a VM residing on your disk is *really* annoying.

The Microsoft documentation to remove the unused applications (Access as a DB? Yeah, right…) wasn’t very straightforward so I post what worked for me after the needed trial-and-error routines. This is a small howto:

    • Install the Office Deployment Toolkit (download for MS Office 20132016). The installer asks for a installation location. I put it in C:\Users\nxadm\OfficeDeployTool (change the username accordingly). If you’re short on space (or in a VM), you can put it in a mounted shared.
    • Create a configuration.xml with the applications you want to add. The file should reside in the directory you chose for the Office Deployment Tookit (e.g. C:\Users\nxadm\OfficeDeployTool\configuration.xml) or you should refer to the file with its full path name. You can find the full list op AppIDs here (more info about other settings)/ Add or remove ExcludeApps as desired.  My configuration file is as follows (wordpress removes the xml code below, hence the image):
      configuration.xml
    • If you run the 64-bit Office version change OfficeClientEdition="32" to OfficeClientEdition="64".
    • Download the office components. Type in a cmd box:
      C:\Users\\OfficeDeployTool>setup.exe /download configuration.xml
    • Remove the unwanted applications:
      C:\Users\\OfficeDeployTool>setup.exe /configure configuration.xml
    • Delete (if you want) the Office Deployment Toolkit directory. Certainly the cached installation files in the “Office” directory take a lot of space.

Enjoy the space and faster updates. If you are using a VM don’t forget to defragment and compact the Virtual Hard Disk to reclaim the space.

Post-it: PROXIMUS_AUTO_FON and TelenetWifree (Belgium) from GNU/Linux (or Windows 7) 2015-04-14

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Wifi

Update 20160818: added Proximus RADIUS server.

The Belgian ISPs Proximus and Telenet both provide access to a network of hotspots. A nice recent addition is the use of alternative ssids for “automatic” connections instead of a captive portal where you login through a webpage. Sadly, their support pages provide next to no information to make a safe connection to these hotspots.

Proximus is a terrible offender. According to their support page on a PC only Windows 8.1 is supported. Linux, OSX *and* Windows 8 (!) or 7 users are kindly encouraged to use the open wifi connection and login through the captive portal. Oh, and no certification information is given for Windows 8.1 either. That’s pretty silly, as they use EAP-TTLS. Here is the setup to connect from whatever OS you use (terminology from gnome-network-manager):

SSID: PROXIMUS_AUTO_FON
Security: WPA2 Enterprise
Authentication: Tunneled TLS (TTLS)
Anonymous identity: what_ever_you_wish_here@proximusfon.be
Certificate: GlobalSign Root CA (in Debian/Ubuntu in /usr/share/ca-certificates/mozilla/)
Inner Authentication: MSCHAPv2
Usename: your_fon_username_here@proximusfon.be
Password: your_password_here
RADIUS server certificate (optional): radius.isp.belgacom.be

Telenet’s support page is slightly better (not a fake Windows 8.1 restriction), but pretty useless as well with no certificate information whatsoever. Here is the information needed to use TelenetWifree using PEAP:

SSID: TelenetWifree
Security: WPA2 Enterprise
Authentication: Protected EAP (PEAP)
Anonymous identity:what_ever_you_wish_here@telenet.be
Certificate: GlobalSign Root CA (in Debian/Ubuntu in /usr/share/ca-certificates/mozilla/)
Inner Authentication: MSCHAPv2
Usename: your_fon_username_here@telenet.be
Password: your_password_here
RADIUS server certificate (optional): authentic.telenet.be

If you’re interested, screenshots of the relevant parts of the wireshark trace are attached here:

proximus_rootca telenet_rootca